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Best Age To Transition From Co-Sleeping
Baby & toddler sleep,Baby health & safety

Best Age To Transition From Co-Sleeping – How To Break Baby Of Co Sleeping Habit?

As a parent, you want to do what is best for your child. The first year of life can be difficult because it’s full of changes and sometimes parents are unsure about how to handle them. One question that comes up often is what age to transition from co-sleeping? Here are some helpful tips on breaking the co-sleeping habit in babies.

What is co-sleeping and why do people practice it?

Co-sleeping is when two or more people share a sleep surface, most often in close physical contact. It can refer to anyone sharing a bed, from parents and their children to couples. The practice has been around for centuries and is still popular in many cultures around the world.

There are many reasons why people co-sleep. For some, it’s because it’s the most convenient way to get sleep when there isn’t another person around to take on baby duty. For others, it can be a bonding experience for mom and baby, giving them uninterrupted time together each night.

For parents who practice bed sharing with their infants or small children, often do it because they believe that it’s safer than having the baby sleep in a separate room. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) actually recommends co-sleeping for the first six months to a year of a baby’s life, as it can decrease the risk of SIDS.

When is the best time to break the baby’s co-sleeping habit?

Most children will naturally begin to transition away from co-sleeping by the time they are one year old. By then, they’ve begun to develop a strong sense of sleeping ‘self’ and can sleep through most sounds and movements that might have woken them up before.

Co-sleeping also has a lot of benefits for babies who are learning to walk and explore their world. It can help them feel secure and safe, as they know that they can always go back to mom or dad if they get scared.

If you’re not comfortable with co-sleeping or if you feel like your child is no longer benefiting from it, there is no set time frame for when you have to break them of the habit. Ultimately, it’s up to you and your child to decide when the time is right. Some parents choose to wean their child slowly off co-sleeping by moving them to a separate bed in their room or by having them sleep in a crib next to their parents’ bed. Other parents choose to top co-sleeping all at once and let the child cry it out.

What are some good ways to break the baby of co-sleeping habit?

There is no proven method for breaking a child from co-sleeping; however, if you’re committed, you can certainly try your hand at sleep training. One common approach is called ‘gradual retreat’, where the child is moved from sleeping beside mom or dad to sleeping in a crib or bassinet next to them, then gradually over time, moved further and further away.

Another method you can try is called ‘extinction sleep training’, which involves simply withholding attention when the child awakens during the night, so they learn to go back to sleep after a certain amount of time. This technique often takes longer to work, but some parents have been successful with it.

You should also try to get the child used to sleep in other places aside from your bed. If you’re not co-sleeping at night, try having them sleep on a nearby sofa or recliner during the day.

If the child is still sleeping in their own bed, but not making it through the night without needing you to feed them or check on them, they might be ready to move to a toddler bed. Keeping them in your room until they are at least three years old can also help prevent problems like night wandering or getting into things that they shouldn’t.

Ultimately, the decision to break your child of co-sleeping is a personal one and there is no wrong or right way to do it. Just make sure that you are doing what’s best for both you and your child.

The best age to transition from co-sleeping is when your baby is around one-year-old. By this time, they have developed a strong sense of sleeping ‘self’, and can sleep through most sounds and movements that might have woken them up before.

Co-sleeping also has a lot of benefits for babies who are learning to walk and explore their world. It can help them feel secure and safe, as they know that they can always go back to mom or dad if they get scared.

If you’re not comfortable with co-sleeping or if you feel like your child is no longer benefiting from it, there is no set time frame for when you have to break them of the habit. Ultimately, it’s up to you and your child to decide when the time is right. Some parents choose to wean their children slowly off co-sleeping by moving them to a separate bed in their room or by having them sleep in a crib next to their parent’s bed. Other parents choose to stop co-sleeping all at once and let the child cry it out.

There is no proven method for breaking a child from co-sleeping; however, if you’re committed, you can certainly try your hand at sleep training. One common approach is called ‘gradual retreat’, where the child is moved from sleeping beside mom or dad to sleeping in a crib or bassinet next to them, then gradually over time, moved further and further away.

Another method you can try is called ‘extinction sleep training’, which involves simply withholding attention when the child awakens during the night, so they learn to go back to sleep after a certain amount of time. This technique often takes longer to work, but some parents have been successful with it.

You should also try to get the child used to sleep in other places aside from your bed. If you’re not co-sleeping at night, try having them sleep on a nearby sofa or recliner during the day.

If the child is still sleeping in their own bed, but not making it through the night without needing you to feed them or check on them, they might be ready to move to a toddler bed. Keeping them in your room until they are at least three years old can also help prevent problems like night wandering or getting into things that they shouldn’t.

Ultimately, the decision to break your child from co-sleeping is a personal one and there is no wrong or right way to do it. Just make sure that you are doing what’s best for both you and your child.

Pros and cons of co-sleeping

Co-sleeping is a practice that has been around for centuries and it is still common in today’s society. It can be advantageous to both parents and their babies as they get the chance to bond with each other, feed more easily, and also sleep less disturbed at night.

However, there are some disadvantages to co-sleeping especially if it becomes an ongoing habit. In this article, we will look at the pros and cons of co-sleeping as well as how to break your baby from co-sleeping.

The Pros of Co-Sleeping

  1. Helps a new parent get a good night’s rest

New parents will understand how hard it can be to function normally during the day when you’ve only had a few hours of sleep the previous night. Co-sleeping can help to make up for lost sleep as the baby is within close proximity and can be easily woken up to feed.

  1. Helps to build a strong bond between parent and child

Babies who co-sleep with their parents often have a stronger bond with their parents than babies who are put in a separate room. It gives the opportunity to new parents to get up during the night to feed or settle their baby back to sleep without disturbing anyone else sleeping in the house.

  1. There’s ample medical support for co-sleeping

Many new mothers find that they can easily breastfeed while lying down if their baby is co-sleeping with them. This is because the baby is within easy reach and there’s no need for either parent to get up in the middle of the night to feed the baby.

  1. Babies who co-sleep tend to cry less at night

Babies who co-sleep with their parents often cry less at night as they are less likely to wake up alone. This means that parents are more likely to sleep through the night without being woken up by their baby’s cries.

The Cons of Co-Sleeping

  1. Babies who co-sleep run a higher risk of sudden infant death syndrome ( SIDS )

Babies who co-sleep are particularly at risk of SIDS as they are more likely to be smothered by their parents or blanket. This is why it is important for parents to take extra precautions when co-sleeping with their baby.

  1. Co-sleeping can lead to unhealthy sleep habits in babies

If a baby becomes used to co-sleeping, he or she may find it difficult to sleep on their own when they are older. This can lead to sleep problems and anxiety disorders in later life.

  1. Co-sleeping can be dangerous for babies with allergies or asthma

Babies who have allergies or asthma may find it difficult to breathe if they are co-sleeping with their parents. This is because the baby is close to their parents and may be exposed to their allergens and asthma triggers.

How To Break Your Baby From Co-Sleeping

  1. Put your baby in his or her own room at bedtime

If your baby is used to co-sleeping, it may be difficult to get them to sleep in their own room. However, it is important to start this process as soon as possible so that your baby can get used to sleeping in their own room and also to avoid SIDS.

Final words:

If you are considering co-sleeping until your baby is older, it’s important to understand what the best age for this transition would be. There are many factors that can affect when a child should make the switch from co-sleeping to his or her own space. For example, some pediatricians recommend waiting until after 12 months of age while others suggest 18 months as optimal. To help answer this question and more related topics about sleep training in general, read our blogs on these subjects today!

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Chelsy Gallagher

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